CAREERS IN MANUFACTURING

Many people really don’t even think about manufacturing as a career. Many times we might think of manufacturing jobs as something people who don’t have a degree get. Not that they are all uneducated, but when you think manufacturing compared to Business, it has different meanings and definitions.

Well, my brother worked as an Operations Manager, Trainer and in general human resources for years with Eli Lilly Corporation, but in the manufacturing end of the company. He wore a suit. Managed people. Had a nice office, but in a different area of the company. Sure many of you know this and experience it now, but did you know the level of careers in Manufacturing?

Well in my reading and research I came across in InDemand Magazine. It’s a little older version magazine that I ran across in a classroom this past school year, I like these mag’s because most of the time they’re around 2-3 years old, but the content is quite useful even now. But I add a little twist to it and try to add whatever new or more informative information 🙂

So upon reading through this magazine, it dedicated an issue to an industry I personally consider lost. An industry that many would not think of working in with a college education and degree. Many do think this way. All I’m doing here for you is providing you with a list of different jobs, titles and careers that you can consider in manufacturing. If you live in or near a primarily manufacturing area and that’s where you intend to try to work, this might be the direction for you.  My town of Fort Wayne is heavy in manufacturing, and if I were younger looking for a career idea, and I wanted to stay in or near The Fort, I would consider these types of careers (below).

Here’s where you come in…

GO TO ONE OF MY FAVORITE SITES TO ENHANCE YOUR KNOWLEDGE AND DEFINITION OF THESE JOBS. Don’t go anywhere else but BLS.GOV (of someone you personally or professionally know) if you want the most accurate information regarding careers and salaries, expected employment and anticipated  growth. It has it all.

Now, I gathered these jobs through what I’ve learned and read about. Check them out and get back to me on your thoughts…there’s more below:

1. MACHINE OPERATOR          2. ROBOTICS OPERATOR          3. OPERATIONS MANAGER
4. ENGINEER          5. PHARMACEUTICAL PROCESS ENGINEER
6. PROCESS TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER    7. PLASTICS FABRICATOR
8. ELECTROMECHANICAL EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN       9. HEALTH AND SAFETY ENGINEER
10. PROCESS CONTROL TECHNICIAN                       11. FIXTURE DESIGNER
12. FOOD INSPECTOR                    13. METAL FABRICATOR             14. MACHINE TOOL TESTER

**Remember to check out http://www.bls.gov/oco/ for accurate descriptions and future outlook.

The money side of things…

These days, and depending on geographic locations, these jobs and careers WILL vary and fluctuate based on that. This is just for informational purposes only so don’t quote me on these. But it’s a great indicator of what you might start with in your chosen career.

Assembler $32,900
Avionics Technician $46,570
Chemical Engineer $78,030
CNC Machine Operator $43,320
Cost Estimator $50,870
Drafter $47,300
Electrical Engineer $79,680
Electrician $41,760
Electromechanical
Equipment Technician $39,580
Environmental Engineer $70,830
Fabric and Apparel
Patternmaker $35,530
Industrial Engineer $67,820
Inspector $31,590
Precision Instrument
Repairer $46,400
Machine Setter & Operator $27,790
Manufacturing Engineer $65,230
Material Mover $31,350
Mechanical Engineer $71,110
Medical Equipment
Technician $31,550
Metal Fabricator $31,260
Model Maker
(Metal and Plastic) $45,520
Painter (Transportation
Equipment) $36,980
Petroleum Engineer $92,840
Plant Manager $109,090
Plastics Fabricator $31,260
Printing Machine Operator $32,300
Safety Technician $39,300
Semiconductor Engineer $90,000
Tool and Die Maker $44,620
Welder $31,430
SOURCE:U.S. DEPT. OF LABOR, BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

The jobs you would not think of…

1.Account Executive       2.Assembler      3.Biochemist      4.Book Binder

5.Buyer      6.CAD Operator      7.Chemist      8.Computer Programmer

9.CNC MACHINE OPERATOR      10.Contractor      11.Cost Estimator

12.Customer Support Specialist      13.Designer      14.Die Maker      15.Drafter

16.Electrical Engineer      17.Electrician      18.ELECTROMECHANICAL

19.EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN      20.ENTREPRENEUR      21.Environmental Engineer

22.Fabric and Apparel Patternmaker      23.Facilities Manager      24.Fashion Designer

25.FIXTURE DESIGNER      26.Food Scientist      27.Graphic Designer

28.HEALTH AND SAFETY ENGINEER      29.HVAC Technician      30.INSPECTOR

31.Instrument Repairer      32.Inventor      33.Industrial Engineer

34.MACHINE OPERATOR      35.Machine Setter      36.MACHINE TOOL TESTEr

37.Manager      38.MANUFACTURING ENGINEER      39.Marketing Manager

40.Material Mover      41.Mechanical Engineer      42.METAL FABRICATOR

43.OPERATIONS MANAGER      44.Ophthalmic Laboratory Technician      45.Packaging Engineer

46.Packer      47.Painter      48.PHARMACEUTICAL PROCESS ENGINEER

49.Planner      50.Plant Manager      51.PLASTICS FABRICATOR

52.Precious Stone and Metal Worker      53.Print Operator

54.PROCESS CONTROL TECHNICIAN      55.PROCESS TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER

56.Quality Control Technician     56.Researcher      57.ROBOTICS OPERATOR

58.Sales Representative      59.Scheduler      60.Scientist      61.Semiconductor Engineer

62.Sewing Machine Operator      63.Shipping Clerk      64.Superintendent2 Supplier

65.Tool Maker      66.Welder      67.Woodworker

These days it takes pretty much any degree to move forward. That seems to be the essence of our liberty in this country. We are all chosen for some purpose in life and when it comes to career choices, what really works for you? Just because it might not be the exact environment or job you wanted, you will get there. It takes some work, passion and belief in yourself. If I can find it, you can find it.

Remember the best type of evidence as to what you really want to do, or will be good at is to see if for yourself. Talk to someone in that industry or job. Get a job or maybe an internship in the industry that allows you whatever exposure  possible for you to make a decision. Now certainly this isn’t possible for everyone, but it is the best way for you to get information on jobs and careers. I can’t tell you how many times I ask students if they’ve considered working in the field f interest. Most of them have not even thought about that as a way to knowing if that’s what they want to do. Manufacturing might be this way.

Your Success is My Success,

Keith

Keith Lipke is a careers and college recruiter, coach, mentor and blogger at The Hope Chest. His passion is to educate, inspire, and give hope to young people who need it upon their search for the right career and college.

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